10 cafes for wifi in Buenos Aires

As a former freelance writer living in Buenos Aires, I’ve tested the coffee shops in the city —the good, the bad, and the bitter—so you don’t have to. Buenos Aires has a strong coffee culture but unfortunately the actually taste of some of the coffee and the terrible WiFi connections in some places can leave mal gusto in your mouth. The following 10 best cafes for working in Buenos Aires have comfortable/ample seating, WiFi, and outlets for your computer—and of course, good coffee and treats.

1. LAB Tostadores de Café

Una publicación compartida de Jose Garcia (@yosekbza) el


LAB doesn’t offer much seating but I have never had a problem with crowds. Order a flat white and the berry muffin—truthfully the best tasting combo I’ve had the pleasure of enjoying while working online.

Where: Humboldt 1542
Neighborhood: Palermo
Hours: Monday through Friday 8 am to 8pm; Saturday 10 am to 8 pm

2. Cocu


Located in the heart of Palermo, Cocu gets very crowded around brunch time so either get there early or after the lunch crowd has died down. If you do get a seat, it’s easy to spend hours there. The owners are French, offering authentic French cuisine. Every pastry on the menu astonishing, but I recommend the pan au chocolate.

Where: Malabia 1510
Neighborhood: Palermo
Hours: Monday to Friday 9 am to 8 pm; Saturday, Sunday and public holidays 10 am to 8 pm

3. Starbucks

I don’t normally recommend Starbucks because most locations are crowded and noisy in Buenos Aires. And, they are considered “elite” because of the very pricey yet very weak latte. However, you can find a few noteworthy locations if you check out enough of them—locations that have a relaxing upstairs seating area with sofas and good lighting. My favorite location is an old apartment building converted into the coziest Starbucks you’ll ever see—complete with wallpaper and carpet.

Location: Av. Cnel. Díaz 1601
Neighborhood: Recoleta
Hours: Monday through Friday 7 am to 9:30 pm; Saturday and Sunday 8 am to 9:30 pm

4. All Saints Cafe

Una publicación compartida de Diego (@soloeldiego) el


I don’t hear a lot of people talking about All Saints Cafe, but it is definitely noteworthy! It’s located in Belgrano so it is possibly a bit far if you are in the neighborhoods of San Telmo or Palermo Soho. But as the café is nestled just a block away from the subway D line and walking distance to Barrio Chino (Chinatown), it’s a great spot to work online all morning and then explore somewhere else for the rest of the day. Plus, it’s one of the few places in Buenos Aires where you can get an American-style donut!

Where: Ciudad de la Paz 2300
Neighborhood: Belgrano
Hours: 8 am to 10 pm

5. LattenTe

Una publicación compartida de LATTEnTE (@lattentecafe) el


With a great flat white, and comfortable stools lining the windows of Thames street, LattenTe is a relaxed coffeehouse popular amongst freelancers, tourists, and locals alike. I especially enjoy it for its location.

On Sundays, Seiko’s Bagels pops-up outside so weekend freelancers can enjoy a dreamy latte and bagel combo.
Where: Thames 1891
Neighborhood: Palermo
Hours: Monday through Saturday 9 am to 10 pm; Sunday 10 am to 10 pm

6. El Ateneo Grand Splendid

Una publicación compartida de eria (@0eria0) el


Does it get much cooler than being able to work in a 100-year-old theater that’s been turned into a bookstore? One of the most beautiful bookstores in the world, El Ateneo also has a cafe inside perched upon what was once the stage of the theater. You can work and enjoy a small coffee—albeit overpriced. There is also lots of room throughout the bookstore for relaxed reading and finding new inspiration for your work.

Where: Av. Santa Fe 1860
Neighborhood: Recoleta
Hours: Sunday 12 pm to 10 pm; Monday through Thursday 9 am to 10 pm; Friday and Saturday 9 am to 12 pm

7. Felix Felicis & Co


With a name inspired by Harry Potter, this newer addition to the Palermo coffeehouse scene serves one hell of a good latte and muffins. The wood bar has outlets built right in for re-charging.

Where: José Antonio Cabrera 5002
Neighborhood: Palermo
Hours: Sunday 10 am to 8 pm; Monday through Saturday 9 am to 8 pm

8. Ninina

Una publicación compartida de Ninina (@nininabakery) el


Ninina prides itself on serving delicious cakes with less guilt for you. With specialty items like flourless cakes and freshly squeezed juices, a couple of hours at Ninina carries a higher price tag but it’s well worth it. I recommend coming to Ninina when you need to work and satisfy a sweet tooth. Try a slice of the Lola Mora cake and a cappuccino with soy milk.

Where: Gorriti 4738
Neighborhood: Palermo
Hours: Monday through Thursday 8 am to 12 am; Friday 8 am to 1 am; Saturday 9 am to 1 am; Sundays and holidays 9 am to 12 am.

9. Birkin

Una publicación compartida de Birkin Café (@birkincafe) el


A relaxed yet sociable atmosphere, Birkin is a higher end cafe perfect for having lunch with a friend or working hard online. I recommend trying the waffles if you enjoy hefty scoops of dulce de leche with your brunch.

Where: República Arabe Siria 3061
Neighborhood: Palermo
Hours: Tuesday through Friday 9 am to 9 pm; Saturday and Sunday 10 am to 9pm

10. Barrio Cafetero


With only about 7 stools lining the wall parallel to the bar, there isn’t much space for working all afternoon. However, if you’re downtown (microcentro) and need a place to work before or after the office, it deserves an honorable mention for its creamy-smooth lattes and super sweet baristas. If you frequent the place, be sure to pick up a stamp card.

Where: Florida 8333
Neighborhood: Microcentro
Hours: Monday through Friday 8 am to 6:30 pm

9 epic outdoor activities in Ushuaia

Editor’s note: These spots are all taken directly from travelstoke®, a new app from Matador that connects you with fellow travelers and locals, and helps you build trip itineraries with spots that integrate seamlessly into Google Maps and Uber. Download the app to add any of the spots below directly to your future trips.

Explore a super sketchy old shipwreck.

 Desdemona shipwreckUshuaia, ArgentinaThis is a few hours outside of Ushuaia close to Cabo San Pablo. It’s a cargo ship made in Germany whose hull cracked…so all of the bags of cement it was carrying formed cement to keep this stationed right where it is for a long time to come. It’s sketchy to walk around inside because all of the metal floors are rusting and fragile, but definite go when the tide is out and walk around the ship.

This place is a few hours outside of Ushuaia close to Cabo San Pablo. You should have 4×4 to get there, or contract a guide service (Tierra Turismo is the only agency I know that goes here). It’s a cargo ship made in Germany whose hull cracked, so all of the bags of cement it was carrying formed cement to keep this stationed right where it is for a long time to come. It’s dangerous to walk around inside because all of the metal floors are rusting and fragile, but definitely go when the tide is out and at least walk around the ship.

Gear up warm and scuba dive the Beagle Channel looking for leopard seals.

 Ushuaia DiversUshuaia, ArgentinaScuba diving the Beagle Channel is cold AF (but totally gives you scuba diving street cred). Visibility is decent but not awesome, but it makes it that much more cool when you come up upon a massive entangled wall of 50 foot algae with no notice. Or a leopard seal if you are lucky. Carlos will guide your trip and he’s a professional. Whether it’s your first dive or your 100th, you’re in good hands. #extreme #scubadiving #scuba

You get a dry suit but it still is cold AF. Visibility is decent but not awesome, but it makes it that much more cool when you come up upon a massive entangled wall of 50 foot algae with no notice. Or a leopard seal if you are lucky.

Get your gaucho on and ride horses along the Beagle Channel.

 Centro HípicoUshuaia, ArgentinaThese guys do horseback trips along the Beagle Channel. You can do a two hour, half day, full day or even a ten day adventure on Peninsula Mitre. There’s no need to have any experience. If you are someone who avoids horse trips because of tired, sad horses, don’t worry…these horses are super safe but have a ton of energy. #activekids

Centro Hípico does horseback trips along the Beagle Channel. You can do a two hour, half day, full day or even a ten day adventure (which explores the isolated Peninsula Mitre). For the day trips, there’s no need to have any experience.

Check out the penguin colonies.

 HarbertonUshuaia, ArgentinaTaking an excursión to the port of Harberton to see the penguins is a must-do when in Ushuaia. There’s Magallanic penguins, Gentoos, and three (yes, three, King penguins). Only Piratour agency gets you trekking by them, the others get you close by boat.

Taking an excursion to the port of Harberton to see Magallanic penguins, Gentoos, and three (yes, three, King penguins). Only Piratour agency gets you trekking by them, the others get you close by boat. There’s a cute bed and breakfast nearby with a cafe with baked goods you should also check out, as it’s a couple of hours from any other town.

Ski or board Cerro Castor.

 Cerro CastorUshuaia, ArgentinaCélebre

This goes down as the southernmost ski center in the world. It’s season runs from about June to October, with some of the most epic conditions happening in September. It has a vertical rise of not quite 3000 ft. with slopes for beginners to world class experts. Nearby there are other centers that have dog sledding and cross country skiing, and the city of Ushuaia is a only about 15 miles away.

Helicopter through the Andes and over the Beagle Channel.

 HeliUshuaiaUshuaia, ArgentinaNot gonna lie, it’s not cheap. But that being said, it was epic AF. You can fly through the valleys in the Andes and feel totally dwarfed by nature while you count endless otherwise-hidden glaciers and turquoise lagoons, The nature photo opps don’t get much better than this. If you are going to splurge once on your trip, do it here.

You can fly through the valleys and over glaciers in the Andes, checking out not only famous Laguna Esmeralda but many other more hidden turquoise lakes and lagoons. The nature photo opps don’t get much better than this. If you are going to splurge once on your trip, do it here. HeliUshuaia can also hook you up with heli-skiing trips and some crazy-exclusive fishing trips.

Drink microbrews at the end of the world.

 GaribaldiTolhuin, ArgentinaMicrobrews for people who are more about sharing artesanal beer with chill people in a remote location – there’s nothing ‘ultra hip’ or pretentious about this place and that’s why it’s so damn charming. It’s in between Ushuaia and Rio Grande just outside of Tolhuin – definitely hit it up, especially if you do a lakes or fishing tour (you’ll already be in the neighborhood). #casual #microbrew

Garibaldi is for people who are more about sharing artisanal beer with chill people in a remote location – there’s nothing ‘ultra hip’ or pretentious about this place and that’s why it’s so damn charming. It’s in between Ushuaia and Rio Grande just outside of Tolhuin – definitely hit it up, especially if you do a lakes or fishing tour (you’ll already be in the neighborhood). When leaving through nearby Tolhuin, fuel up at the La Union bakery for the trippiest experience while not on drugs that the region offers.

Tierra del Fuego National Park.

 Tierra del Fuego National ParkUshuaia, ArgentinaThis is only about 15 minutes outside of town and warrants a visit. It can get crowded, so try to go with a company that knows how to avoid the tour busses (I went with Tierra Turismo and they were able to avoid the crowds). Solid hiking trail info is tricky to come across. There are a couple of campsites you can crash at, but you need to be prepared and bring all your gear – there’s no refugios. Dress for insanely quick changes in weather – sun, snow, high winds, it’s all possible.

This is only about 15 minutes outside of town and warrants a visit. It can get crowded, so try to go with a company that knows how to avoid the tour busses. Solid hiking trail info is tricky to come across. There are a couple of campsites you can crash at, but you need to be prepared and bring all your gear – there’s no mountain refuges to help you out. Dress for insanely quick changes in weather – sun, snow, high winds, it’s all possible. Don’t leave before checking out the tiny post office. You can get your passport stamped with an ‘end of the world’ stamp and the old postmaster dude who runs the show there is a character.

Go off-roading.

 Tierra Turismo “Excursiones Naturales”Ushuaia, ArgentinaIf you only have time or money for one activity in/around Ushuaia, make a point to set something up with these guys. They offer 4×4 tours deep into the region’s best places, with a total respect for nature. They know how to get you away from the crowds…and you’ll probably end up feeling like long lost friends with your guide at the end of the trip. Every guide here is top notch and super cool, but if you happen to end up with Ignacio, bust out some old Guns and Roses or Bon Jovi and watch the show go down. You’ll thank me later. #hiking #extreme

Tierra Turismo offers 4×4 tours deep into the region’s best places, with a total respect for nature. If you can’t stand the idea of being cooped up in a truck all day, schedule one of their 4×4 / kayak trips. They know how to get you away from the crowds…and you’ll probably end up feeling like long lost friends with your guide at the end of the trip. Every guide here is top notch and super cool, but if you happen to end up with Ignacio, bust out some old Guns and Roses or Bon Jovi from your phone and watch the karaoke show go down. You’ll thank me later.

My reverse culture shock

Reverse Culture shock is a thing.

Growing up in the United States you are used to living a certain lifestyle, getting nice things, and having easy access to almost anything you want. Life is great. I grew up in the “first world” and didn’t think twice about it.

Now I live in Argentina, what some would call it a “third world country” or a developing country. So far within my two short years there, I have managed to get a stable job, find an apartment, created a strong tight-knit group of friends, and be in a relationship with a man I love. I have created a new lifestyle with new customs and cultures that are completely different from my previous life. Now, whenever I go home (which is maybe once a year), I start to compare how different everything is between the USA and Argentina. I have reverse culture shock! When in the US, everything around me is obviously familiar, but there are some things I cannot register in my head. Here’s what I’m talking about…

Bigger is not always better.

The first thing I notice getting off the plane and driving home is how ENORMOUS everything is. The grocery stores, the houses, the cars. When you are used to everyone driving tiny economy cars with two doors or a standard basic four-door family car, you start wondering: who really needs a giant 4-door truck with 6 wheels? What are you really gonna do with that extra turbo engine and enhanced muffler? Who is going to live in that giant 8-room mansion of yours? It all just seems a little excessive. That said, I’m not complaining about the giant groceries stores.

Where is the public transport?

Living in the city center of Cordoba you can get almost anywhere by public transportation. There are plenty of buses and taxis to get you from point A to B. Grocery store? Two blocks around the corner. Park? A 15-minute walk from my apartment. Going to work? A 30-minute bus ride that costs me less than a dollar. Getting home from a night out and not worrying about drunk driving is the best when taxis are available 24/7. What about a weekend trip to another city? No problem, super comfy and inexpensive sleeper buses leave almost every 30 minutes from the bus terminal.

In the states if I wanted to go anywhere I’d need a car. To go shopping, to the city, to a restaurant, to the grocery store, etc. it’s at least a 15-minute drive to any location. Why is everything for far? And gas prices? Nobody’s got time for that!

Where is everybody else?

In the US, my family and I take trips to downtown, and the whole time the city is completely empty of people. The streets are quiet, there is no hustle and bustle like in Argentinian cities. In the Unites States, with the exception of big cities like New York, Chicago, LA, etc. most people live outside of the city center and commute for either work or for leisure such as shopping, dining, or sports games. Big cities mostly consist of office buildings, shopping malls, restaurants, museums and government spaces. So naturally, the cities are relatively quiet with little commotion during the off hours. In Argentina, and almost every city in Europe, people live, work, and socialize in the city center. The streets are always full and there is always something going on.

There are too many rules.

There are so many useless rules. Can’t walk here, can’t smoke here, stop sign here, speed limit there. It’s a constant bombardment of rules and regulations. In Argentina, as long as you’re not hurting anyone, pretty much anything goes and no one cares.

True story; I went to New York/Stanford for business and rented a car. I was zooming in and out of lanes like nobody’s business… until I was pulled over. The officer routinely asked:

“Do you know why I pulled you over today?”
Nope. No clue.
“You were recklessly driving and changing lanes without proper signaling.”

Completely dumbfounded the only thing I could say was, “I’m sorry, officer, I’ve been living abroad in Argentina for over 2 years and that’s how they drive.” In the end, I got off with a warning.

I now make a lot of things myself.

Back home I was used to buying everything pre-packaged, pre-made, and ready-to-eat. Here, everything is in its rawest form. For example; I love hummus and would eat it almost every day for a snack in the US. In Argentina, it doesn’t exist and hardly anyone knows what hummus even is, so I started making my own. I had no idea it was that easy! I even learned how to make my own peanut butter, now that was a game changer. So far I’ve learned how to make everything from homemade soups, bread, pasta sauce, guacamole, cookies, fresh quinoa salad and even RANCH. You may have to go to 3 different stores to find all the ingredients you need, but once you do you feel like you’ve just completed a complex scavenger hunt. I actually like this form of preparing my own food. Now I know exactly what I’m eating and there’s none of this mystery ingredient nonsense. Too much food in the states is packaged processed with who knows what. In Argentina, you get the real deal.

Needs vs. wants

Argentina has a very unstable economy and the Peso is always rising and falling, which creates high prices on many consumer goods. A pair of jeans could easily cost you over $200, a nice quality sweater anywhere from $80. Electronics? Forget about it. You quickly realize that those extra pair of jeans aren’t really that necessary if you have a good pair already.

Going shopping in the states I saw many cute sweaters, shirts, and shoes on sale but I kept thinking, “Do I really need and extra pair of shoes? It’s not going to fit in my suitcase. Where am I actually going to wear this?” I hardly bought anything. Who needs 10 pairs of jeans? There are only 7 days in a week after all.

Over indulging becomes an issue.

In the United States, we take everything for granted. We always want more for less or free everything. Everyone is trying to through the best deal. At a restaurant, you get free water, free refills, free unlimited bread, free salad, two-for-one, and it goes on and on. And if you don’t find these amazing deals, you are somehow being “ripped off”. I sometimes can’t even finish my main course by the time I’ve had my appetizer, bread, salad and the endless supply of free cokes.

You get one round of complimentary bread in Argentina…Sometimes. You want a salad in Argentina? Be prepared to pay for it. Refills? Say what? You have to pay by the bottle, and yes even the water. But hey! It also explains why people are so dang skinny here. I think I’ve changed my eating habits for the better.

Family suddenly means everything.

Family is a very important part of Argentinian culture. Being in a relationship, I have gotten the chance to meet the majority of my boyfriend’s family and there are a lot of family members. I went to a birthday party for his uncle’s 60th and at least 100 people showed up! No matter the occasion; birthday, father’s day, holiday, or Sunday, they always always, always get together for an afternoon asado or just to spend time together.

In my family, on the other hand, we are used to being very far apart from each other. Some live across the country and some even live across the ocean, so if I’m lucky I will see them once a year. Maybe every second year. I have some cousins whom I probably wouldn’t even recognize any longer. So when I go home for Thanksgiving and see my parents, my brother, and several of my close relatives, I am overwhelmed with emotion. I probably cried at least 4 times before leaving the US the last time I was there. Everyone is doing their own thing in the states and sometimes traditional family values get lost.

Some days I prefer to live the Argentinian way; other days I really miss the luxury of living back home. None of these things is necessarily wrong. It’s just a different lifestyle and values.